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Managing Infection Control in Care Homes

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Managing Infection Control in Care Homes

Managing infection control in care homes isn’t just best practice: it’s also the law. Under Regulation 15 of the Health and Social Care Act, it is a legal requirement for all care and nursing homes to be clean, suitable for purpose and properly maintained. This includes maintaining the high standards of hygiene that are expected, in order to manage infection control.

Preventing the spread of infection in care homes largely comes down to knowledge about hygiene practices, and a commitment to put those practices into action. It’s also vital that care staff understand what leads to infection, so they can effectively implement these policies. The latest government guidelines make it clear that hygiene is of the utmost importance for care homes, and the standard of hygiene in any care home will be reflected in its CQC rating. Stopping the spread of infection in your care home should be of the highest priority for all members of staff, so read on below to find out what you can do to manage infection control. 

Committing to hand hygiene

Many of us are already aware that hand hygiene is the number one way of stopping the spread of infection, but are all of your staff demonstrating best practice when it comes to this most basic of hygiene habits? The World Health Organisation (WHO) has set out very specific guidelines for when and how care home staff should wash their hands, and they also offer free resources including instructional posters and reminders to stick above basins.

The WHO advise that care staff wash their hands in five specific sets of circumstances:

  • Before touching a resident
  • Before carrying out cleaning procedures
  • After any risk of body fluid exposure
  • After touching a resident
  • After touching a person’s surroundings

Hands should always be washed with soap and water at these five key points, or at any other time if they are soiled. If the hands are not soiled, hand sanitiser products can be used in line with the guidelines. This is an essential part of the infection control policy for care homes, as it breaks the cycle of contamination.

Not sure if your care staff know the facts about hand hygiene? Ask them to take a quiz based on the WHO guidelines. 

Cleaning in care homes

A key aspect of infection control in care homes is to carry out thorough and regular cleaning, which ensures that residents have a safe and infection-free environment. If your staff sometimes struggle to coordinate this cleaning process, try using our free care home cleaning schedule to make sure everyone is aware of their responsibilities.

Providing proper cleaning training is also essential to work towards better infection control in your care home, as is using the right disinfection products. Staff should also be aware of the latest safety guidelines regarding sharps disposal and the use of disposable gloves at appropriate times.

We hope you found our guidance on managing infection control useful. Here at Care Shop, we offer a wide range of infection control products, including hand sanitisers, disinfectants and disposable gloves, so you can find everything you need to effectively manage infection control in your care home. 

Managing infection control in care homes isn’t just best practice: it’s also the law. Under Regulation 15 of the Health and Social Care Act , it is a legal requirement for all care and nursing homes to be clean, suitable for purpose and properly maintained. This includes...

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